Boris Slutsky

Poems by Boris Slutsky

Slutsky’s father was a white-collar worker and his mother a teacher. He went to school in Kharkov and from 1937 he studied in Moscow, first in law school and then at the Gorky Literary Institute. During World War II he made friends with many of the poets who were to die in the war and was himself severely wounded. Though he published some poetry in 1941, he did not publish again until after Stalin’s death in 1953. Ilya Ehrenburg wrote an article in 1956 advocating that a collection of Slutsky’s work be published. He created a sensation by quoting many unknown poems. Discussing Slutsky’s poetry, Mikhail Svetlov said, “Of one thing I am sure — here is a poet who writes better than we all do.”

Slutsky’s first collection, Pamiat' (Memory) (1957), immediately established his reputation as a poet. His most celebrated poems are “Kelnskaia iama” (The Pit of Cologne) and “Loshadi v okeane” (Horses in the Sea). His poems “Bog” (God) and “Khoziain” (The Boss) sharply criticized Stalin even before the Twentieth Party Congress in 1956.

Slutsky’s poetry is deliberately coarse, prosaic, and always distinctive. He evoked many imitators and much ridicule, but he also taught many of the postwar generation of poets. During the scandalous attacks on Boris Pasternak’s Doctor Zhivago in 1959, Slutsky unexpectedly came out against Pasternak. It was a crucial error. Many of his admirers turned their backs on him, but, more important, he never forgave himself. When he died, he left so much poetry unpublished that almost every month for several years new poems appeared in magazines and newspapers.

1944

1950

1954

1955

1959

1960

1961

1964

1968

1969

1973

1975

1977

1986

in german

Boris Sluzki (deutsch)

2019

in italian

Boris Sluckij (italiano)

1950