Vladimir Mayakovsky
Brooklyn bridge

Coolidge, old boy,
give a whoop of joy!
What’s good is good —
                                  no need for debates.
Blush red with my praise,
                                        swell with pride
                                                                 till you’re spherical,
though you be ten times
                                      United States
of America.
As to Sunday church
                                 the pious believer
walks,
          devout,
                      by his faith bewitched,
so I,
       in the grisly mirage
                                     of evening
step, with humble heart,
                                      on to Brooklyn Bridge.
As a conqueror rides
                                 through the town he crushes
on a cannon
                    by which himself’s a midge,
so —
        drunk with the glory —
                                          all life be as luscious—
I clamber,
                proud,
                          on to Brooklyn Bridge.
As a silly painter
                           into a museum Virgin
infatuated,
                 plunges
                              his optics’ fork,
so I
       from a height on heaven verging
look
       through Brooklyn Bridge at New York.
New York,
                 till evening stilling and bewildering.
forgets
           both its sultriness
                                       and its height,
and only
              the naked soul
                                      of a building
will show
               in a window’s translucent light.
From here
                 the elevators
                                      hardly rustle,
which sound alone,
                               by the distance rubbered,
betrays the trains
                            as off they bustle,
like crockery
                    being put by
                                        in a cupboard.
Beneath,
              from the river’s far-off mouth,
sugar
          seems carted from mills by peddlars,
it’s the windows of boats
                                       bound north and south —
tinier
         than the tiniest pebbles.
I pride
           in the stride
                              of this steel-wrought mile.
Embodied in it
                        my visions come real —
in the striving
                      for structure
                                          instead of style,
in the stern, shrewd balance
                                             of rivets and steel.
If ever
           the end of the world
                                           should arrive,
and chaos
                 sweep off
                                 the planet’s last ridge,
with the only
                    lonely
                              thing to survive
towering over debris
                                this bridge,
then,
        as out of a needle-thin bone
museums
                rebuild dinosaurs,
so future’s geologist
                                from this bridge alone
will remodel
                   these days
                                     of ours.
He’ll say:
               this mile-long iron arch
welded
            oceans and prairies together.
From here old Europe
                                   in westward march
swished
             to the winds
                                 the last Indian feather.
This rib will remind
                              of machines by its pattern.
Consider —
                could anyone with bare hands
planting
             one steel foot
                                   on Manhattan
pull Brooklyn
                     up
                          by the lip
                                         where he stands?
By the wires —
                      those tangled electric braidings —
he’ll tell:
              it came after steam, their era.
Here people
                    already
                                hollered by radio,
here folks
                had already soared up by aero.
Here life
             for some
                           was a scream of enjoyment,
for others —
                 one drawn-out,
                                         hungry howl.
From here the martyrs of unemployment
dashed headlong
                            into the Hudson’s scowl.
And further —
                   my picture unfurls without hitch —
by the harp-string ropes,
                                       at the stars’ own feet,
here stood Mayakovsky,
                                        on this same bridge,
and hammered his verses
                                          beat by beat.
I stare like a savage
                                 at an electric switch,
eyes fixed
                 like a tick on a cat.
Yeah,
          Brooklyn Bridge. . . .
It’s something, that!

Translated by Dorian Rottenberg

Владимир Маяковский
Бруклинский мост

Издай, Кули́дж,
радостный клич!
На хорошее
                     и мне не жалко слов.
От похвал
                 красней,
                                как флага нашего мате́рийка,
хоть вы
             и разъюнайтед стетс
                                                 оф
Америка.
Как в церковь
                        идёт
                                 помешавшийся верующий,
как в скит
                 удаляется,
                                    строг и прост, —
так я
         в вечерней
                             сереющей мерещи
вхожу,
           смиренный, на Бру́клинский мост.
Как в город
                   в сломанный
                                         прёт победитель
на пушках — жерлом
                                    жирафу под рост —
так, пьяный славой,
                                  так жить в аппетите,
влезаю,
              гордый,
                            на Бруклинский мост.
Как глупый художник
                                    в мадонну музея
вонзает глаз свой,
                                влюблён и остр,
так я,
          с поднебесья,
                                  в звёзды усеян,
смотрю
             на Нью-Йорк
                                   сквозь Бруклинский мост.
Нью-Йорк
                  до вечера тяжек
                                              и душен,
забыл,
            что тяжко ему
                                    и высо́ко,
и только одни
                        домовьи души
встают
            в прозрачном свечении о́кон.
Здесь
           еле зудит
                            элевейтеров зуд.
И только
               по этому
                              тихому зуду
поймёшь —
                 поезда́
                             с дребезжаньем ползут,
как будто
                 в буфет убирают посуду.
Когда ж,
               казалось, с-под речки на́чатой
развозит
                с фабрики
                                  сахар лавочник, —
то
    под мостом проходящие мачты
размером
                 не больше размеров булавочных.
Я горд
            вот этой
                           стальною милей,
живьём в ней
                       мои видения встали —
борьба
            за конструкции
                                      вместо стилей,
расчёт суровый
                           гаек
                                  и стали.
Если
         придёт
                     окончание света —
планету
             хаос
                     разделает в лоск,
и только
               один останется
                                         этот
над пылью гибели вздыбленный мост,
то,
     как из косточек,
                                тоньше иголок,
тучнеют
              в музеях стоя́щие
                                            ящеры,
так
      с этим мостом
                              столетий геолог
сумел
          воссоздать бы
                                   дни настоящие.
Он скажет:
                — Вот эта
                                 стальная лапа
соединяла
                  моря и прерии,
отсюда
            Европа
                         рвалась на Запад,
пустив
            по ветру
                          индейские перья.
Напомнит
                 машину
                              ребро вот это —
сообразите,
                    хватит рук ли,
чтоб, став
                  стальной ногой
                                            на Манге́тен,
к себе
           за губу
                       притягивать Бру́клин?
По проводам
                      электрической пряди —
я знаю —
              эпоха
                        после пара —
здесь
          люди
                   уже
                          орали по радио,
здесь
          люди
                    уже
                           взлетали по аэро.
Здесь
          жизнь
                     была
                               одним — беззаботная,
другим —
             голодный
                             протяжный вой.
Отсюда
             безработные
в Гудзон
              кидались
                              вниз головой.
И дальше
                 картина моя
                                      без загвоздки
по струнам — канатам,
                                       аж звёздам к ногам.
Я вижу —
             здесь
                       стоял Маяковский,
стоял
           и стихи слагал по слогам. —
Смотрю,
               как в поезд глядит эскимос,
впиваюсь,
                  как в ухо впивается клещ.
Бру́клинский мост —
да...
         Это вещь!

Перевод стихотворения Владимира Маяковского «Бруклинский мост» на английский.
>